Recent Posts

Is She Pregnant or Just Fat?

Is She Pregnant or Just Fat?

Getting our cow preg checked was an interesting adventure. She had been with a bull some time in the beginning of March which was a couple of months before we bought her. However, we didn’t know for certain if she was pregnant. She has had…

Our First Cow

Our First Cow

Have you ever raised a backyard cow? Until now, neither had we… Meet Sequoia! Sequoia is our Dexter cow. She is a miniature breed and hopefully will be the start of our own herd.

Blanching and Freezing Corn

Blanching and Freezing Corn

Corn is one of those foods that my kids can’t get enough of. They especially love corn on the cob. Sadly corn on the cob is a very seasonal food that comes on in abundance. Instead of eating so much that we get sick of it, I like to preserve it so that we can enjoy it in the middle of January too.

What is blanching and why do it? Blanching is heating up a food to a point where it kills the microorganisms living on but doesn’t cook the food. You can do this with many vegetables to aid in preserving them for longer amounts of time.

Have you ever tried to just freeze your corn? In my experience, shucking the corn and just freezing it raw results in squishy corn that has lost it’s molecular integrity. It won’t hurt you and the flavor isn’t bad but the texture is all wrong. This breakdown comes from the bacteria that are still on the corn that cause food to rot. Blanching helps to kill off any germs and bacteria as well as preserve the flavor and texture of the corn.

So how do you blanch corn? Find your biggest pot and set it on the stove to boil. Have some corn already shucked and picked clean of silk ready to go. When the water reaches the boiling point, use tongs to set the corn into the pot. Leave the corn in for 2 minutes and then pull out promptly.

You do not want to cook the corn, only blanch it. To stop the cooking process you then put the corn into an ice bath to cool it back down. After the corn has reached a cool temperature it can be removed from the ice bath, patted dry and then can be put into ziplock bags to be frozen.

Don’t forget to write the date on it!

Blanched corn last well up to about a year in the freezer. Just take it out toss it in some boiling water and cook as though it was fresh out of the garden, because, hey, it was last summer!

Easy Cherry Cheesecake Topping and Pie Filling

Easy Cherry Cheesecake Topping and Pie Filling

Cherry season is upon us! And guys! We got our first crop of cherries off of the little sapling we planted this year. Yup! We got… drum roll please….. 4 cherries! But all joking aside, it is cherry season so it’s time for my all-time…

Victorio Cherry Pitter Product Review

Victorio Cherry Pitter Product Review

So many cherries! I picked so many cherries. Seriously, close to 100 lbs of cherries. By day 3 of processing them I was wondering what possessed me to bring home quite so many. It was at this point I began to give some away to…

The Billy Goat not so Gruff

The Billy Goat not so Gruff

We have had goats for a year now. We got 3 Nigerian Dwarf doelings in June of last year. At the time 2 of them were only 10 weeks and the other was 4 months. We named them Salt, Pepper and Oreo. This week they met their boyfriend, a 1.5 year old buck we have decided to call Beardsley!

So meet Beardsley! He is a tri-colored Nigerian Dwarf buck. We are hoping he might be able to bring a little color into our monochrome herd. We threw him in with the girls and within hours he was already trying to prove his manliness with at least one of them. We are planning on having goat kids on the farm again in 5 months!

We had been actively looking for a buck for a few weeks and when we found him I was in love with his colors and patterning. I hope he gives us beautiful babies.

Nigerian Dwarf goats aren’t very big. They are a great backyard breed for people who want some livestock but nothing too big. My girls at 14 and 16 months weighed only 50 and 63 pounds. Beardsley hasn’t yet seen the scales, but he isn’t much bigger, although his horns sure are!

When we went to get him we realized that we didn’t have an easy way to bring him home. He was located about an hour away and we felt that if we wanted him we needed to act now before he was sold. Our stock trailer has an issue of not having lights currently so we couldn’t bring him home that way.

But because of his small size I borrowed a large dog crate from the neighbors and we brought him home in the back of the truck. He handled the ride well, but didn’t want to come out of the crate when we arrived back home. When he saw his new girlfriends though he decided it would be ok to come out. So now we have a complete herd that will most likely be growing in 5 months!

Bees and more Bees!

Bees and more Bees!

So I have been putting off writing this post because I was sad and kind of embarrassed that it happened, but the reality is that it was out of my control. I was so excited to get my own hive, and harvesting one from an…

Raising Baby Chicks

Raising Baby Chicks

Wanna get started with baby chicks? Here’s a breakdown on what we do to be ready to bring some home!

All Around Awesome Pizza Crust Recipe!

All Around Awesome Pizza Crust Recipe!

We have discussed my family’s love of pizza before, but I have yet to share with you all my go-to pizza crust recipe. I got this one from my Mother in Law who I lovingly refer to as Mama.

I have never asked Mama where she got this recipe or if she made it up but its a great one. I use it for more than just pizza. I use it when making fry bread for Navajo Tacos and for breadsticks.

I have tried in the past to use less yeast than the recipe calls for because lets face it I am cheap and want my ingredients to last as long as possible, but being stingy on the yeast makes it so the dough is more difficult to work with because it doesn’t have the light and elastic quality needed to be able to stretch it out nicely.

It’s pretty simple requiring only a few ingredients: dry active yeast, sugar, oil, salt, water and flour. Its pretty difficult to run out of the ingredients needed to make it, but I do tend to run out of yeast if I don’t pay attention to it. The other ingredients I purchase in much larger quantities so I usually have them on hand.

So here’s the secret family recipe…

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp dry active yeast

1 cup warm water

1 Tbsp sugar

1 tsp salt

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

2 1/2 cups of flour

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water. Next add sugar, salt and oil. Mix together before adding the flour. Add the flour and mix until you have a lightly sticky ball of dough. I like to use my Bosch mixer for making pizza dough, but this can be done in a Kitchen Aid mixer, with a electric mixer with a dough hook, or simply by hand with no mixer.

At this point the dough is ready to be pressed out onto a pizza pan or formed into bread sticks or fry bread. Before pressing the dough out be sure to spray the pizza pan with spray oil to keep it from sticking. I have ruined many a pizza by forgetting this step.

Top your pizza however you like and bake at 425 degrees for 14 minutes. Add a minute or two more for very heavily topped pizza. Then cut and enjoy! Don’t forget Pizza Thursday!!

Sweet Chili Chicken Pizza!

Sweet Chili Chicken Pizza!

Check out this recipe for an unconventional but equally delicious pizza!